Heat wave italy 2017

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Follow up on the heat wave Thursday, August 3rd, 2017

heat wave italy 2017

21 June CEST+ If you're already sweltering in the Italian summer temperatures, we've got some bad news: the heatwave is.

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At least two people have died from the heat - one in Romania and one in Poland - and many more have been taken to hospital suffering from sunstroke and other heat-related conditions. In Albania, firefighters and soldiers struggled to contain as many as 75 forest fires and the country asked the European Union for emergency help. Firefighters were also busy in Serbia, Bosnia, Macedonia and Croatia. With temperatures expected to stay around 40 degrees Celsius into next week, authorities advised people to increase their water intake and Red Cross volunteers across Europe visited the homeless and elderly and other people at risk. Wine growers in Italy have started gathering the grape harvest weeks earlier than usual due to the extreme heat. Carlo Petrini, founder of the Slow Food movement, wrote in La Stampa newspaper that the grape harvest had never started before Aug. Italian authorities have issued weather risk warnings for 26 cities, including tourist hubs Venice and Rome, where many of the fountains have been turned off due to a lengthy drought.

Updated August 05, Swathes of southern and eastern Europe have sweltered in temperatures above 40 degrees Celsius in a heatwave nicknamed "Lucifer", which has killed at least two people across the region. Italy and the Balkans were worst affected, though areas as far north as southern Poland also basked in abnormally hot temperatures, and European weather hub Meteoalarm issued its highest grade "red" warnings for 10 countries. At least two people have died from the heat one in Romania and one in Poland and many more have been taken to hospital suffering from sunstroke and other heat-related conditions. In Albania, firefighters and soldiers struggled to contain as many as 75 forest fires and the country asked the European Union for emergency help.

The sweltering temperatures have caused the mercury rise to as high as 44C in the south of Spain. The devilish moniker was coined after several countries across the continent saw temperatures head north of 40C. Unusually high temperatures are being recorded across an area spanning much of Spain and Portugal, southern France, Italy, the Balkans and Hungary. Meteoalarm - a Europe-wide operation made up of dozens of national weather services - has warned that "major damage and accidents are likely, in many cases with threat to life". It has issued red alerts - considered "very dangerous" and meaning "exceptionally intense meteorological phenomena are forecast" - for parts of Italy, Switzerland, Croatia and Poland. Orange alerts - which mean dangerous weather is expected - are in place in Spain, southern France, Greece and much of the Mediterranean.

The entire country is in for a warm week with temperatures gradually on the rise, reaching up to C in some areas, but remaining in the early 30's across most of the peninsula. However, high levels of humidity mean it will feel even hotter, particularly in cities in the inland areas of the Po Valley, centre-south, and Sardinia. Perceived temperatures in those regions could reach 40C, according to the meteorologists at Meteo. It's all down to an anticyclone, currently positioned over Spain and southern France but on its way to Italy where it's bringing sizzling temperatures. Wednesday is likely to be one of the hottest days of the entire summer, with the mercury particularly high in Emilia Romagna, the southern parts of Veneto and Lombardy, and Puglia. Sporadic thunderstorms are also forecast, particularly in Alpine areas.



Italy sizzles in mid-June heatwave

The meteorologists agree: The long hot spell gripping parts of Europe this past week is uncommon., Eleven southern and central European countries have issued extreme heat warnings amid a brutal heatwave nicknamed Lucifer, with residents and tourists urged to take precautions and scientists warning worse could be still to come.

'Lucifer' heat wave holds Italy, eastern Europe in fiery grip

The summer of in Western Europe and the Euro-Mediterranean region featured a series of major heat waves. Early August saw a particularly intense heat wave called "Lucifer" in southeastern countries. The three day heat event broke numerous records, including several all time highs. An analysis conducted by the World Weather Attribution group in September found that climate change has made extreme three day heat events like Lucifer four time as likely since The increasing frequency and intensity of heat waves is among the most obvious and well documented effects of climate change, according to the National Academy of Sciences. Four out of five record-hot days globally are now attributed to climate change. The increasing frequency and intensity of heat waves is among the most obvious and well documented effects of climate change.

After a mid-June heatwave which saw temperatures reaching up to 36C, the start of the week brought relief thanks to winds sweeping in from the north. But the mercury is about to rise again, with perceived temperatures likely to approach 40C according to the forecasters at Meteo. The warm spell is expected to last through the weekend and will be more intense than the previous heatwave, meteorologists said. Between Wednesday and Sunday, temperatures are predicted to be as much as 8C higher than the seasonal average, with the north, centre-west, and Sardinia getting very hot indeed. On Wednesday, temperatures were above 30C across the peninsula and highest in northern inland areas, with Bologna expected to reach 35C by early afternoon. And most of the country will see an increase in temperatures on Thursday, and again on Friday, as a north African anticyclone makes its way north.

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5 thoughts on “Heat wave italy 2017

  1. 13 June CEST+ The mercury has soared in Italy over the past few days, and the heatwave seems to show no signs of letting.

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